Category: Jewelry

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Precious stones are minerals of intense brightness, very hard and rare. You can also call them gems. This you can get at the AiryCharm. As you see, they must fulfill 4 characteristics so that it can be considered a precious stone.

Minerals: all the solids of inorganic origin are minerals, which are natural substances and have a certain chemical formula (fixed). If you meet these 3 conditions we will say that it is a mineral.
Of intense brightness: they shine.
Very Hard: means that they do not scratch easily. The hardest mineral is the diamond.

AiryCharm – Emerald

It is the most precious stone in the beryl group. The emerald name comes from through the old really means “green precious stone.” The wonderful emerald green colour is incomparable in the world of the gem. It is not surprising then that the emerald is classified as one of the four traditional gemstones along with sapphire, ruby and diamond. You can get this at AiryCharm.

Emerald, by definition, is a medium green or dark blue-green beryl, in which the green colour is derived from impurities of chromium, vanadium, or a combination of both. The most popular and valuable colour is a light bluish-green in a medium dark tone with saturation from strong to vivid. The term “Colombian” emerald has often been used to describe vivid, light bluish green stones of medium to medium-dark colour, regardless of their actual geographical origin. Emeralds of lighter color are sometimes called “Brazilian” emerald, even if they were extracted in Africa. Almost all natural emeralds contain characteristic inclusions. For that reason emeralds are generally more fragile than other beryls and should be handled more smoothly. Almost all emeralds are treated with oil or resins to fill in the tiny cracks.

Illumination at at AiryCharm

It looks better in daylight. The artificial light would expose inclusions and fractures that would show that the stone is a natural emerald.

Clarity

Clarity is important, but more inclusions in the emerald are tolerated than in virtually any other gem. Unlike other beryl gems, emeralds usually contain inclusions and other defects. These defects are not seen as negative aspects of the emerald as they would be for other gemstones. In fact, these failures are considered part of the character of the stone and are used to ensure the buyer a natural stone.

Cut

Cutters love this unique gem. In fact, they have developed a special cut just for this gem: the emerald cut. The clear design of this rectangular or square cut with its oblique corners highlights the beauty of this valuable gem squarely, at the same time protecting it from mechanical stress. Emeralds are also cut in many other forms, mainly the classical ones, but if the raw material contains a large number of inclusions, it can often be cut into a rounded soft cabochon, or into one of the emerald drops, which are very popular in the India. Clear and transparent specimens sometimes come in brilliant cuts.

Location and deposits of the emerald

Emerald mining is almost exclusive in guest rocks, where the emerald becomes small veins or cavity walls. Colombia is the world centre of emerald mining. The Muzo mine, northwest produces fine quality stones of a deep green colour. The Chivor mine, northeast of Bogotá, is another important deposit, other places promising successful additional mining results. Brazil has several deposits in Bahia, Goiás and Minas Gerais. The stones are lighter than the Colombian ones, mostly yellow-green and are often free of inclusions. Brazil also supplies rare emerald cat’s eye and very rare emeralds with a six-star star.

South African deposits are concentrated in the northern Transvaal. But only five percent of the stones found in Cobra and the Somerset mines are of good quality. Most stones light or muddy and only suitable for cabochon cuts. Zimbabwe has several emerald deposits, the most important being the Sandawana mine in the south. The crystals are small but of very good quality. Russia has deposited in the northern Ural of Sverdlovsk. Good qualities are rare, most stones are light or muddy and only suitable for cabochons. Further deposits are in Afghanistan, Australia (New South Wales, Western Australia), Philippines, Ghana, India, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Pakistan, Tanzania, Zambia and the United States (North Carolina).

Common treatments of the emerald

Oil is a common treatment for emerald. This term refers to the practice of immersing emeralds in a colourless oil or resin. It is often done using a vacuum chamber to aid penetration. Non-standard treatments go further for the use of green and hardened coloured oils, such as epoxy resins. These treatments dramatically improve the appearance of the gems but require special care in cleaning and adjustment. Steam, solvent and ultrasonic cleaners can remove oils, making inclusions that had barely protruded into the anguished relief. That damage is only temporary since emeralds can be re-oiled.

Emerald world fame

One of the largest in the world is the so-called “Mogul Esmeralda”. It dates from 1695, weighs 217.80 carats, and is about 10cm tall. One side of it is inscribed with prayer texts, and engraved on the other there are gorgeous floral ornaments. This legendary emerald was auctioned by Christie in London to an unnamed buyer for 2.2 million dollars on September 28, 2001. Esmeraldas have been held in high esteem since ancient times. For that reason, some of the most famous emeralds are seen in museums and collections.

Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, has so much jewellery that she has a special storage room, said to be about the size of an ice rink, and located 40 feet below Buckingham Palace. This does not include the British Crown jewels, which are kept in the Tower of London. The Queen’s personal jewellery is kept for $ 57 million and most of it was received as gifts. The fabulous jewels of its collection include the “Cambridge and New Delhi parure Dunbar”, a fantastic set of emerald jewellery, which includes a diadem of emeralds. You can get this at AiryCharm.

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